Confit, Gochujang, Chicken Wings, Oh My!

In this recipe we used the precision of CVap® cooking, the classic French confit technique, and a favorite Korean condiment to make some of our favorite chicken wings ever. Here’s how we did it!

Plated wings

Confit(konfi) is any type of food cooked slowly over a long time as a method of preservation. Its etymology is from the French word confire, literally “to preserve.”

Confit as a cooking term describes food cooked in oil or sugar water, at a lower temperature (as opposed to deep frying). Confit preparations are done at oil temperatures as low as 90°C (194°F) – sometimes even cooler. Popular dishes include confit de canard (duck confit) or confit de ‘Oie (confit of goose). Confit is excellent for food preservation. Classically, once the food product was in confit it could be stored in its cooking container and sealed by the fat in which it was cooked. This extended the food’s shelf life. Confit is usually used in contemporary cuisine to mean long, slow cooking in oil or fat at low temperatures. Today confit is most often used for flavor infusion and tenderizing. The classic element of preservation has long been forgotten.

Gochujang is a paste used in Korean cooking. It’s made from red chili peppers, fermented soybeans, rice, and salt.

Confit of Chicken Wings with Gochujang

Ingredients

  • 2 Quarts canola oil
  • 2 Tablespoons sesame oil
  • 6 Cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • One finger fresh ginger, peeled and sliced
  • 3 Pounds chicken wings, cut into drumettes and flats
  • 2 Sticks unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 Cup Gochujang paste
  • ¼ Cup honey
  • ½ Cup fresh coarsely chopped cilantro

Directions

  1. Preheat CVap Cook & Hold Oven to 170°F food temperature and 200°F air temperature.
  2. Place canola oil, sesame oil, garlic, ginger and chicken wings in a half-size 4” deep hotel pan. The oil should just cover the wings.
  3. Place in preheated CVap oven and cook for a minimum of two hours. Chicken should be very tender, and fat should be rendered.
  4. Chicken may be refrigerated for up to a week in this condition. The fat prevents oxygen from getting to the chicken, and should extend the chicken’s shelf life by up to 100%.
  5. When ready to serve, heat your fryer to 375°
  6. Mix Gochujang with melted butter and honey in a saucepan. Heat until honey is melted and butter is well mixed with the chili paste.
  7. Transfer sauce to a medium sized stainless bowl.
  8. Remove wings from confit shortening and cook in the fryer for three minutes. The wings should be crisp and golden brown.
  9. Toss wings in chili sauce and garnish with fresh chopped cilantro.
Chef Barry cutting wings
Cut the wings into drumettes and flats.
Basic ingredients for confit wings.
Basic ingredients, mise en place.
Wings in confit
Wings marinating.
Confit wings out of the oven.
Confit wings, out of CVap oven.
Dropping wings into fryer.
Confit wings heading into the fryer.
Chef Barry tonging wings out of the fryer
Chef Barry tongs wings out of fryer, to drain pan.
Fried Confit wing
Fried confit wings, allowed to drain.
Chef Barry prepares the Gochujang sauce
Chef Barry prepares the Gochujang sauce.
Sauced wings.
Sauced Gochujang wings.
Gochujang Wings
Gochujang Wings, ready to eat!

 

Have questions? Click here!

What the Turducken!

Holidays may be the time for tradition, but we decided it was time to shake things up! We cooked the infamous turducken. In case you aren’t familiar, that’s a turkey, duck, and chicken all rolled into one. Sound too good to be true? Honestly, we thought so too!

Let us warn you, this isn’t a task to take on unless you are fully committed to the challenge. Patience is your friend while you prepare the turducken.

Process

De-bone the meat – turkey, chicken, and duck. We did this the day before to save time. Depending on your expertise, this can take from 45 to 90 minutes.

Make stuffing to place between each layer of meat. This is the list of ingredients we used, but feel free to put your own spin on this favorite. We also made a double batch for each turkey to ensure we had enough for each layer.

  • Stuffing mix of your choice (we used corn bread)
  • Celery
  • Onion
  • Chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
  • Fresh parsley
  • Fresh sage
  • Minced garlic
  • Paprika
  • Pepper
  • Salt

Now for the Turducken!

  • Season each piece of meat with salt and pepper.
  • Lay turkey out flat so it’s ready for the stuffing.
  • Pat the first layer of stuffing on the turkey.
  • Place chicken thighs on top half of turkey, and chicken breasts on the lower half.
    img_0224
  • Pat a second layer of stuffing on top of the turkey-chicken combo.img_0226
  • Place the duck in the middle of the stuffing layer.
  • Add the last layer of stuffing.img_0228
  • Begin to pull up sides of turkey to secure everything inside with twine or skewers.

img_0230 img_0232 img_0233 img_0236

  • Season outside of turkey – we used paprika, salt, and pepper.

Settings

We doubled up and made two turduckens, one was cooked using our CVap® Cook and Hold Oven, while the other was prepared by CVap® Staging in our oven and then frying in our Collectramatic®  Pressure Fryer.

The turducken prepared in the Cook & Hold was cooked on high yield at 170°F doneness and 4 level browning for six hours, then held overnight for eight hours at 150°F doneness and 1 level browning.

The staged and fried turducken was staged at 165°F and 0 browning over night for 14 hours and then finished in the Collectramatic Fryer for three minutes.

Roasted Turducken – 82% yield

img_0339img_0341

 

 

 

 

 

 

Staged & fried Turducken– 84% yield

img_0276img_0282

img_0284

img_0289

  

Fried Chicken and Steamed Rice Held in CVap Stay So Nice!

Uncle Jack Fried Chicken is a Malaysian restaurant chain that uses our Collectramatic pressure fryers to cook fried chicken. Ordinarily they placed the finished chicken in a display warmer for serving. To maximize holding time, they limited the warmer to 35°C (95°F), putting a limit on the amount of time they could hold cooked chicken before it was no longer fit to sell. We suggested they test our CVap holding cabinet, in the hopes of extending their holding time and improving food quality. The test results were exciting!

Holding Cabinet Preparation: The CVap Holding Cabinet was set at food temperature 54°C (129°F) and food texture at + 28°C (82°F). The evaporator was filled with hot water, and the cabinet was allowed to preheat for 45 minutes, to reach full temperature.

12:05pm: Chicken was cooked and removed from the fryer, and put into holding cabinet (15 pieces). Initial taste of chicken: crispy outside, moist inside and meat is very hot to touch and taste.

Chicken fresh from fryer

12:10pm: Cooked rice (wrapped in oil paper) is put into the same holding cabinets with fried chicken. Initial taste of rice: moist, sticky, and fragrant.

Uncle Jack Rice after one hour in CVap holding cabinet

13:05pm: (holding 60 minutes)

Chicken was still crispy outside (though very slightly less crisp than when first removed from fryer), moist inside, still hot, and color had not changed. The chicken breading remained crisp.

13:35pm (holding for 90 minutes)

Chicken was still crispy and moist. Color was good. Food retained flavor, with minimal loss of freshness.

Fried chicken after 90 mins in CVap

13:55pm (holding for 2 hours)
The skin remained crispy, though not as crisp as when it was initially fried. Flavor and moisture were still good. Color had not darkened.
Fried chicken after two hours in CVap

14:00pm (rice held for 2 hours)

Rice was hot and tasted fresh; not dried out at all.
Rice held two hours in CVap holding cabinet

15:35pm (3.5 hour holding time)
Chicken tasted good, skin remained crispy, meat was moist. Although the chicken was not “just cooked” fresh after 3.5 hours, it was still at safe temperature, and appetizing enough to serve.

15:40pm (after holding for 3.5 hours)
Rice was hot, and texture was good.

These photos, taken at different times over the course of testing, give you an idea of the appearance of the food.

Fried Chicken

Uncle Jack's Fried ChickenFried chicken after 3.5 hours in CVap

Rice
Rice held two hours in a CVap holding cabinet

Electricity Consumption: 800 watts

Holding Capacity per Cabinet: 13 full size sheet pans, each rack equals one basket (4 heads) chicken, or 338 pieces

CVap Holding Cabinet Test Conclusions

Goals for Future Testing

  1. Extending the holding time for the chicken without compromising the texture, taste, and food safety.
  2. Testing other products, (wrapped rice was incorporated).
  3. Improving staff work flow.
  4. Staff can pre-prepare chicken during lean hours in preparation for peak hours, thus shortening the waiting time while producing the best tasting fried chicken.
  5. During lean hours, customers can still savor the taste of freshly fried chicken from the holding cabinet.
  6. Minimize food shrinkage.
  7. Minimlize food waste.
  8. Extension of holding times for other foods is possible, since CVap cabinets are versatile enough to hold both crispy and moist foods.

One Final Note – CVap Technology is great, but it’s not magic.

The very nature of fried foods (crisp outside with moist interior) promotes evaporation. CVap technology is the best available to maximize holding time, but even CVap, using the necessary high differential setting (the difference of food texture setting over the food temperature setting) will eventually lose the battle to maintain food temp and freshness. It’ll hold fresh longer than the competitors, but if the food is crunchy (fried chicken, French fries, etc), it can only be held for so long.

On the other hand, moist foods, such as rice or noodles, are perfect for CVap, and can be held for many hours with no loss of temperature or quality.

The consensus of the Uncle Jack test was that it was possible to lengthen the holding time for chicken. More testing would be needed to perfect the texture, taste and crispiness, to come up with the Uncle Jack Standard Operating Procedure.

Bringing the Heat with Nashville Hot Chicken

Hot ChickenWinter may be waning, but the popularity of Nashville Hot Chicken sure isn’t. We decided to try our hand at preparing a big batch. It was as good (and hot!) as promised.

Nashville Hot Chicken’s powerful poultry story originated nearly seven decades ago, at Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack. Apparently Thorton Prince was quite the lady’s man. Tiring of his late night escapades, his gal served him up a Sunday breakfast of fried chicken, generously doused in cayenne pepper and other fiery spices. Her revenge backfired – rather than crying out in pain, he loved it, and the inspiration for Nashville Hot Chicken was born. If you’re interested, read the whole story on Prince’s website. Numerous other restaurants and chains, inspired by Prince’s, have put their own twist on this Nashville classic.

Dipping chicken

We brined in the fridge overnight using a simple 6% brine. If you want to learn everything you need to know about brining go to our friend’s site Genuine Ideas (browse under their food header). We lightly dusted the chicken with our seasoned flour, and then dipped it in a simple blend of eggs, buttermilk and hot sauce.

Then we tossed lightly again in our breading mix, giving us a light double breaded chicken. Double breading creates a nice robust crunch once the chicken is fried.

Properly prepped, it was ready for the Collectramatic fryer.

Breaded in the Basket

Cooked chicken

The chicken was open-fried for 15 minutes at 325°F. It emerged from the fryer a mouth-watering golden brown. After draining excess oil, we painted with the spicy special sauce using a pastry brush. It was as good as we had hoped, delivering a delicious heat that delighted our taste buds while making our faces flush and our brows sweat.

This chicken can be held for two hours in a CVap holding cabinet. After frying, place it directly in a CVap set to 135 +50. Apply the sauce just before serving.

Yummy!

Here’s a pared-down version of the recipe (in case you’re not feeding an army).

Nashville Hot Chicken

  • 2 – 3 1/2-4-pound chickens, each cut into ten pieces (breasts halved)
  • 1 gallon of 6% brine
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 cups buttermilk or whole milk
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar-based hot sauce (such as Tabasco or Texas Pete)
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour seasoned with salt, pepper and paprika. (You may use your own special flour mix if you’d like).
  • Vegetable oil (for frying; about 10 cups) (unless, of course, you have a Collectramatic fryer handy).
  • 6 tablespoons cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  1. Whisk eggs, buttermilk, and hot sauce in a large bowl. Whisk flour and remaining 4 teaspoons salt in another large bowl.
  2. If you’re not using a Collectramatic fryer, fit a Dutch oven with frying thermometer; pour in oil to about two inches depth. Heat over medium-high heat until thermometer registers 325°F. Pat chicken dry. Working with one piece at a time, dredge in flour mixture, shaking off excess, and then dip in buttermilk mixture, letting excess drip back into bowl. Dredge again in flour mixture and place on a baking sheet.
  3. Working in four batches and returning oil to 325°F between batches, fry chicken, turning once after 15 minutes, until skin is deep golden brown and crisp and an instant-read thermometer inserted into thigh pieces registers 185°F and 165F white meat. This usually takes ten more minutes after the turn for a total cook time of 25 minutes. Transfer to a clean wire rack set inside a baking sheet. Let oil cool slightly.
  4. Whisk cayenne, brown sugar, chili powder, garlic powder, and paprika in a medium bowl; carefully whisk in 1 cup hot frying oil or melted lard. Brush fried chicken with spicy oil. Serve with bread and pickles.

Enjoy!

Fried Chicken: It’s on the Menu

Crispy Fried Chicken

Chicken Trivia:

  • More than half of all chicken entrees ordered in restaurants are for fried chicken.
  • In 2007, 95% of commercial restaurants had fried chicken on their menu.
  • The average American eats over 80 pounds of chicken each year.
  • According to the National Chicken Council, more than 1.25 billion chicken wing portions were consumed on Super Bowl Weekend in 2012 (more than 100 million pounds).

What menu item is going to keep customers coming back for more? To-go orders? Catering offerings? What is going to set your product apart from your competition? Fried chicken!

Let’s look at the features and benefits of our Collectramatic® Pressure Fryer. Available in 4-head (32 pieces per drop) and 6-head (48 pieces per drop) versions – now that’s a lot of fried chicken!

Benefits of pressure frying:

  • Quicker cook times
  • Juicier product
  • Tenderization
  • Texture control
  • Healthier product

Benefits of a Winston Collectramatic Pressure Fryer:

  • Microprocessor controller
  • Reliability – Very few moving mechanical parts
  • Round pot – For strength with a single weld, sediment cannot build up in the corners and continue to cook/burn the oil.
  • Footprint – Let’s look at the numbers. With a LP56 fryer 6-head, you can fry approximately 192 pieces of chicken per hour and 1,200 pieces before you need to filter the shortening. Our collector, the largest in the industry, catches all the sediment from the cooking vat, so it does not continue to cook

At a recent training, with an install of three LP56 Collectramatic fryers, the customer was able to pressure fry 576 pieces per hour and 3,600 pieces before they needed to filter the shortening.

Partner this with a Winston Shortening Filter and a CVap® Holding Cabinet or two, and now you have a fried chicken program sure to bring success!

OF59C Open Fryer

The Collectramatic Open Fryer OF59C uses FilterFry technology to cook chicken and other foods to golden perfection. Its patented cold zone prevents cracklings from scorching and tainting your shortening. The OF59C is an open fryer with 18 lb (8.2 kg) capacity and an 8-channel programmable control.

 

F552A8 Shortening Filter

The F552A8 Shortening Filter with 82.5 lb. (37.1 kg.) tank capacity saves space by storing underneath our four-head fryers when not in use. Its portable design enables you to filter one or multiple fryers. Heavy-duty pump and motor speeds filtering time to three gallons per minute. Quick disconnect provides safe operation.